Preparedness

Preparing today can help you immeasurably tomorrow. A sudden disaster can cause catastrophic damage and interrupt the operations and livelihoods of your organization or community indefinitely. Our experts are your trusted advocates, here to help you prepare for the unexpected and build you up to a position of faster recovery sooner if disaster should strike. 

Preparedness Resources

Preparedness refers to measures taken to prepare for and reduce the effects of disasters — to predict and, where possible, prevent disasters, mitigate their impact on vulnerable populations, and respond to and effectively cope with their consequences. How you plan for a disaster determines how quickly you recover. The Tidal Basin professional planning team has the qualifications and experience preparing, training, exercising, and executing plans to continue essential services post-crisis and reduce possible effects.

Preparedness Grant

Preparedness Grant Management

  • Homeland Security (HSGP)
  • Transit Security
  • Federal Highway Administration (FHWA)
Learn More About Preparedness Grant Management
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Planning

  • Continuity of Operations Plans (COOP)
  • Business Continuity Plans (BCP)
  • Vulnerability and Business Impact Analysis
  • Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan (CEMP)
  • Long Term Recovery Plans
  • Mitigation Plans
  • Debris Management Plan
  • Compliance Reviews - Super Circular
  • GAP Analysis
Learn More About Planning
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Training

  • FEMA Programs and Procurement
  • FEMA Debris Management
Learn More About Training
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Exercises

  • Homeland Security Exercise and Evaluation Program (HSEEP) Compliant
  • Tabletop and Full Scale
Learn More About Exercises

Meet the Top Talent for Preparedness Services

Our Tidal Basin team has the unmatched experience, resources, and network to mobilize quickly, evaluate thoroughly, and work closely with you on your preparedness plan. Our experts include planners, engineers, project managers, insurance specialists, emergency managers, tribal liaisons, and other key professionals with extensive experience working on some of the worst natural and man-made disasters over the last thirty years.

Frequently Asked Questions

To thoroughly prepare your organization or community from disaster, it is important to take a step back and realize your preparedness options. Listed below are some common questions.
  • Q
    What is the Comprehensive Planning Guide (CPG) 101?
    A

    CPG 101 is a guide developed by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA). CPG 101 is designed to help both novice and experienced planners navigate the planning process. Used in its entirety, this guide provides information and instruction on the fundamentals of planning and their application.

  • Q
    What are some of the key components to preparedness?
    A

    Typically a good preparedness process involves six key steps. They include:
    a. Knowing and assessing your risks and vulnerabilities.
    b. Estimating capabilities to address those risks.
    c. Building and sustaining your capabilities.
    d. Developing plans to manage the entire life cycle of a potential crisis.
    e. Validating plans through exercises.
    f. Reviewing and updating plans.

  • Q
    What is the National Incident Management System (NIMS) and what are the benefits?
    A

    NIMS is a comprehensive, nationwide systematic approach to incident management. There are several benefits to NIMS, including:
    a. Enhanced operations and collaboration.
    b. Scalability and flexibility.
    c. Promotion of an all-hazards approach to preparedness.
    d. Enabling of a wide variety of organizations to participate effectively in emergency management or incident response.
    e. Institutionalizing professional emergency management or incident response practices.

  • Q
    What is the Preparedness Cycle and what are some of the processes involved?
    A

    The Preparedness Cycle is a continuous cycle of planning, organizing, training, equipping, exercising, evaluating, and taking corrective action in an effort to ensure effective coordination during incident response.

    Preparedness Cycle 5
  • Q
    What is emergency preparedness?
    A

    Emergency preparedness is taking action so you are ready for emergencies before they happen. The objective is to simplify decision making during emergencies and to reduce or prevent fatalities or injuries through emergency preparedness response.

Who We
Have Helped

Discover in detail how our team of professionals is playing an instrumental role in helping hundreds of organizations, governments, communities, not-for-profits, and private sector clients prepare and maximize their financial recovery sooner from the worst disasters.
Tidal Basin assigned a uniquely-qualified project management team with extensive, existing knowledge of our region to this initiative. Their knowledge and experience with developing products that close gaps and are responsive to stakeholder needs was evident throughout the project. Tidal Basin was effective at confirming the need/project scope at the outset of the project. The stakeholder working group sessions that were facilitated by Tidal Basin revealed a more nuanced planning need (a coordination tool instead of an operational response plan), and Tidal Basin quickly adapted to this shift in project scope. Despite this change, Tidal Basin was able to provide an end-product that exceeded our expectations. I found the team to be particularly responsive to communications (email/phone) and well-suited to elicit difficult/nebulous information from the planning stakeholders and translate that into a written product. Tidal Basin always exhibited great customer service throughout the project and I highly recommend Tidal Basin without reservation. In fact, I have used them multiple times!
Andrew Slater
Program Director - NVERS Northern Virginia Emergency Response System
The State of Alaska...[has] a significant investment in the disaster recovery process for both state and federally declared events.... The collaboration with Tidal Basin in these efforts has been so successful and seamless that in most instances applicants and FEMA staff don't even realize we have contractors on board unless we tell them. Our interaction with Tidal Basin staff and managers works and feels like true teammates and the result is a faster, more comprehensive delivery of disaster recovery resources to survivors.
Sam Walton
Program Manager for Disaster Assistance - State of Alaska

Severe storms dumped massive amounts of rain in the Southern Tier of New York State in the summer of 2006, resulting in widespread flooding. 

When Hurricane Katrina struck, bringing with it widespread flooding and damage, the City of Slidell took the brunt of the storm. Located just 30 miles north of New Orleans, the two cities were both hit full-force by the destructive power of the hurricane. Unfortunately for Slidell, the nation first focused on the recovery of New Orleans. The City of Slidell didn't begin its recovery operations until Adjusters International had been hired, bringing the expertise required to turn the recovery process around.

  • City of Harrisburg, Pennsylvania
  • Hudson River Park Trust, New York
  • Village of Islamorada, Florida
  • City of Hialeah Gardens
  • County Risk Sharing Authority, Ohio
  • City of Weslaco, Texas
  • 1665-DR-NY Snow Emergency
  • Shinnecock Tribal Nation
  • AK-236, AK-237, AK-238 & AK-240 (State-Level Disaster Declarations)
  • 1710-DR-NY Severe Storms and Flooding

Contact Us

If you are in need of thorough preparedness planning, we can help!
Call us at 888.282.1626 or fill out the form below:
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